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ALIEN CRIMINAL DEFENSE

Knowledgeable Alien Criminal Defense Attorney

 

The chief mistake that any immigrant or illegal alien can do after he or she is charged with a crime is to not seek the help of an experienced immigration lawyer. While criminal defense attorneys can defend people against the criminal aspects of a criminal charge, they are not usually versed in dealing with the immigration law consequences of criminal charges issues. At the Morristown, New Jersey, law office of Brian D. O'Neill, our firm's founding attorney is experienced in the area of alien criminal defense and is capable of helping you and your criminal defense counsel minimize the immigration consequences of a conviction.

 

Immigrants face different laws that can affect their immigration status and lead to deportation or inadmissibility. Even if not formally convicted of a crime, your status may be affected if you admit "sufficient facts to warrant a finding of guilt." If charged with crimes of moral turpitude, aggravated felonies or crimes specifically listed in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), you need to hire an experienced alien criminal defense lawyer immediately.

Since 9/11, this area of the law has been constantly changing. There is too much at stake to risk not hiring an experienced alien criminal defense lawyer. For a free initial phone consultation, contact the law firm of Brian D. O'Neill.

Before pleading guilty to any criminal offense, contact our alien criminal defense law firm for a free initial phone consultation.

If you are an immigrant and get in trouble with the law, you need to get our help quickly. Call us 201-803-2126

We will explain your rights and the possible consequences a criminal conviction can have on your immigration status:

Even if you are not convicted under state law, you may still have a conviction under federal immigration law. 

The government will deport you from the United States if it determines you were convicted of certain criminal offenses. 

There is no such thing as an expungement for immigration purposes. 

Certain convictions may not get you deported but may make it impossible for you to leave the United States and come back.